The House as it was circa 2005

2005 courtyard facade from the south
2005— the courtyard and front facade of the house

Here is a photomontage of the house as seen from the south, looking north. I pieced together the image quite a while ago without the use of any image-merging software, but it still gives a good enough impression of the style and state of the building.

le cadastre—Fabre de Lagrange

The footprint of the building makes a shape of a reversed capital L , with the north (garden) facade 30m in length, and the east facing side, 20m in length—shown in the following image with detail from the Cadastre plan .
The area shaded red is the building,
that shaded orange is the courtyard, 
and the pale yellow area the land to the north of the building

Also on the cadastre image, I’ve circled the west end of the building with the label ‘RUIN’. We referred to it as such because the roof had long since collapsed and fallen in and the north wall had since deteriorated over the years ansd was leaning outwards precariously.

There were only two rooms that were ‘habitable’, those being two adjacent rooms on the first floor—they had been recently used as dayrooms by two farm labourers who were working for our neighbour during the 1990s. In the top image, these were situated behind the door and under the chimney at the right of the photo.

We actually bought the house three years before this photo was taken, but didn’t sell our first house next door and move in until 2005. In 2002, the house had no sanitation, the electric was supplied to a few sockets and light fittings via a heavy industrial cable slung across from another building owned by the former owner, and the water, likewise, was supplied via a pipe branching off existing plumbing from another barn in the hamlet.

The-House-as-was-N-facadeThis view of the back of the property clearly shows the ‘ruin’ end on the right of the photo. The roof had long since fallen in and with no floor or attic joists holding the walls together, they had become very unstable. Sometime around the late 1980s, a local mason had safeguarded the rest of this part of the building by building a blockwork wall (position A in the image) across the middle and re-roofing the half seen left of centre. The wall at position C in the image was leaning outwards and was demolished to within 2 metres of the gable end. The camera position roughly corresponds  to where the fosse septique and sand filter are now situated

ruin 2002the overgrown garden 2002

Here are two little thumbnails taken in 2002 showing how overgrown the property had become. You can just see me through the stone opening standing in what is now the front courtyard, at position B in the top photo.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s